All photography provided by Leah Varjacques and Kaila Skeet-Browning. 

I believe rape culture is one of the greatest CRISES facing our generation. Voicing consent exists to challenge it, and reclaim healthy, positive sex for young adults. 

 

Our Mission

The mission of Voicing Consent is to provide youth with a safe space to learn about consent, and share their stories and passion for this issue through written work, art and videos, thereby generating understanding about consent and allowing voices to be heard. Voicing Consent is attempting to better prepare youth and young adults to have positive and healthy sexual relationships, and tackle rape culture in an empowering, positive and motivating way. Voicing Consent recognizes that life is intersectional and rape culture may affect different groups of people in different ways. We respect all gender and sexual identities. 

ABout the project

Voicing Consent was created as part of a post program social justice project for the Experiment in International Living's Leadership Institute's Public Health and Community Development trip to India in 2015. The criteria for the project was to develop and produce something that would work to better your community. I believe that rape culture is dishearteningly prevalent in my generation, and increasing understanding about consent is crucial. Consent education is desperately needed across the country, and this project is an attempt at filling that need. 

About Me

I'm Lucia Gagliardone. I'm 19 years old and from Sharon, VT. I'm currently a freshman at Bowdoin College in Maine. I love dancing, hiking/adventuring in the wilderness, travelling to foreign countries and speaking Spanish, reading, and playing soccer. I am passionate about human rights, social justice, public health and education. I have had a special interest in women's rights and rape culture since hiking the Long Trail and realizing how much I was controlled by the gender stereotypes that drive our current society. I have experienced real fear for my safety as a woman several times, and know what it's like to feel taken advantage of. Several of my close friends have been raped/sexually assaulted.

 

 I believe no one deserves to feel afraid and I am devoted to fighting sexism and rape culture. I also have experienced mutual respect and empowerment in both platonic and intimate relationships, and know how wonderful and imperative consent and equality are in all our relationships. I think human connection is the most powerful thing in the world. 

Please feel free to contact me with any questions, comments, and/or suggestions! My email is lwgaglia@bowdoin.edu.


Other EIL Projects

The Westchester Youth Gender Equality Conference, organized by Zachary Gallin, on April 10th, 2016. For more info, visit http://wygec2016.wix.com/home or contact Zachary Gallin at wygec2016@gmail.com

Support and Awareness for Organ Donation, by Ashley Taylor. Watch her video at http://youtu.be/PjP7raXtNzo 

 

Acknowledgments and thanks

Thank you Kaitlin Haskins, for all of your love, ideas, and expertise on designing the website. You are a joy. (Kaitlinhaskins.com)

Thank you, Kaila SkeetBrowning, your beautiful photography and patience with this project were incredible. Additional thanks to Mike Tracy and Leah Varjacques for photography. 

Thank you for the wonderful logo, Luna SkeetBrowning, and for all your support. 

Thanks to Melanie Brubaker and all of World Learning for sending me to India, teaching me invaluable lessons about the world, believing in me, and guiding me through this project. Melanie, I am so grateful for you. 

 Thank you, Woody, for everything. Especially the superb writing. 

Thank you Zachary Gallin, Lydia Roe, Harvey Kelley, Quinn Thomashow, Emma Peterson, Peter Jacobson, Cameron Woods, Ashley Taylor, Sadie Dutton, Leah Varjacques, Claire Crowley, Brandon Tracy, Christa Wurm, Maria Piasecki, and Sonja Horschitz for all your encouragement and support.

Thank you to my lovely family, Mom, Dad and Ty, for supporting me and loving me. I love you guys so much! 

Works Cited

Anderson, Nick and Peyton M. Craighill. “College Students Remain Deeply Divided Over What Consent Actually Means”. The Washington Post.  The Washington Post. 14 June 2015. Web. 1 May 2016.

Carmona, Richard, Joycelyn Elders and David Satcher. “Renew the US Commitment to Sex Education”. Washington Post. Washington Post. 22 May 2015. Web. 27 March 2016.

“Consent is Sexy”. The University of Georgia Student Health Services. The University of Georgia. 11 January 2016. Web. 12 March 2016.  

“Driver’s Ed for the Sexual Superhighway: Navigating Consent”. Scarleteen. Heather Corinna. 2016. Web. 14 March 2016.

Foderaro, Lisa W. “At Yale, Sharper Look at Treatment of Women”. New York Times. The New York Times Company. 7 April 2011. Web. 1 May 2016.

Ford, Clementine. “Your Vagina is not a Car”. TED Conference at the Southbank Center. London, United Kingdom. 5 February 2015. Oral Presentation (Web).

Frederickson, Barbara L. “What are Good Positive Emotions?”. Review of General Psychology. Vol. 2 (1998): N. 3, 300-319. Web. 27 March 2016.

“Frequently Asked Questions about the Change in the UCR Definition of Rape”. The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Uniform Crime Reports Unit. FBI. 11 December 2014. Web. 1 May 2016.

Ianes, Paloma. “Sex Ed: What Kids Are - and Aren't - Learning”. Fox News. Frankly Media and WXIX. 6 May 2015. Web. 21 March 2016.

Krakauer, Jon. Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town. New York: Penguin Random House LLC, 2015. Print.

LastWeek Tonight. “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Sex Education”. Online Video Clip. Youtube. Youtube, 9 August 2015. Web. 10 February 2016.

“National Survey of Family Growth”. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC. 6 November 2015. Web. 27 March 2016.

Pierce, Cindy. Sexsploitation. Brookline: Bibliomotion, 2015. Print.

“Sex Education”. Advocates for Youth. Advocates for Youth. 2008. Web. 27 March 2016.

“Sex Education”. Mississippi First. Mississippi First. 2016. Web. 21 March 2016.

“Sexuality Education”. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. The United Nations. 2016. Web. 18 April 2016.

Singletary, Kayce and Alexis Stratton. “Language and Rape Culture”. TED Conference at Columbia. Newberry, South Carolina. 11 May 2014. Oral Presentation (Web).

“State Policies in Brief: Sex and HIV Education”. Guttmacher Institute. Guttmacher Institute. 1 March 2o16. Web. 21 March 2016.

“Statistics about Sexual Violence”. NSVRC. National Sexual Violence Resource Center. 2015. Web. 18 April 2016.

“Statistics”. RAINN. Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network. 2013. Web. 18 April 2016.  

The Education of Shelby Knox. Dir. Marion Lipschutz, Rose Rosenblatt. Incite Pictures, 2005. Film.

“The Importance of Consent”. ACHA. The University at Buffalo. 2008. Web. 12 January 2016.

“Theory of Reasoned Action”. CIOS. The Communication Institute for Online Scholarship. 2016. Web. 18 April 2016.

Thomas, Brynne. “A Life of Rape Culture”. TED Youth Conference at Trinity College School. Port Hope, Ontario, Canada. 31 May 2015. Oral Presentation (Web).

Vernacchio, Al. For Goodness Sex: Changing the Way We Talk to Teens about Sexuality, Values, and Health. New York: HarperCollins Publisher, 2014. Print.

Wolf, Naomi. Vagina: A New Biography. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2012. Print.

Wright, Bill. “Health Education Amendments”. Utah State Legislation. The United States Government. 10 February 2012. Web. 21 March 2016.